Inspiration for my blogs can come from anywhere. This time, inspiration came unexpectedly from my eight-year old daughter. A few weeks ago we had been discussing a situation in the playground that had not gone so well for her and I said that it was really important to be assertive; to ask for what you want with respect for the other person and for yourself, or words to that effect; so when I asked my family what I should write my next blog about, my daughter instantly said “Why don’t you write about being assertive?” So here we are!

Assertiveness is the cornerstone of positive, healthy communication, where everyone gets to state their needs, have positive self-esteem, and have respect for themselves and for other people. Sounds good doesn’t it? The problem is, for various reasons we don’t always find it that easy to ask for what we want and so may be defensive, passive-aggressive (more on this later) or just plain aggressive, paving the way for resentment and negative confrontation.

So in this blog we are going to:

  • Define what assertiveness means,

  • Explore why passive-aggressive behaviour holds us back from being assertive,

  • Look at ways to develop your own assertiveness and foster a culture of assertiveness at work

I’m also going to share my own journey to assertiveness.

 

“I’m OK, You’re OK”

In order to define what assertiveness is, let’s first look at what it isn’t. Have you ever noticed how some people seem to find it easy to ask for things and state their needs in a way that nobody loses face? Whereas other people might get what they want, but in a way where they seem to be imposing their will on others? That is the difference between assertiveness and non-assertiveness.

Like Emotional Intelligence (see my previous blog here), assertiveness starts with self-awareness of who one is and how our behavior impacts on others (self-responsibility). While aggression leads to either defensiveness or more aggression, assertiveness leads to clear communication and often, resolution. Assertive people possess good self-awareness, good self-respect and respect for others. They also take responsibility for their actions.

At the heart of assertiveness lies the theory of transactional analysis (TA), developed by Psychiatrist Eric Berne, and in particular the concept of “life positions”.  Berne’s philosophy of TA and life positions posits that all people are born “OK” and that in childhood people make decisions based about themselves based on how they are regarded and treated by significant others such a parents, family, teachers and so on. For many, they make a decision that they are “not OK” and therefore this becomes their “life position”.

Fortunately, Berne believed that whatever our life position, given time and with the right support we might choose to make new decisions about our self-beliefs, and therefore our beliefs about others. We can choose to adopt an assertive life position where we can be our authentic assertive selves, and allow others to do the same. I am not suggesting it is easy to develop this approach to assertiveness and it won’t happen overnight, but I know from personal experience that it is possible.

 

My journey to assertiveness

I didn’t always feel so great about myself. From a young age, I learned that other people’s needs often came before mine. Because I didn’t see other people being assertive around me, I didn’t know any different so I learned either that I wouldn’t get what I needed (I wouldn’t be heard), or I learned to manipulate, be aggressive or adopt ‘passive/aggressive’ behavior to “get my way”. The turning point came much later in life after a failed relationship when someone suggested I read Nathaniel Branden’s wonderful book “The Seven Pillars of Self-Esteem”.

Assertiveness is naturally tied up with self-esteem, so once I had figured out what negative thoughts behaviours were holding me back, I realized that in order for people to treat me how I wanted to be treated, I had to treat them well in turn, and I had to state my needs, without aggression.

I have been on that journey ever since. I don’t always find it easy to be assertive, and sometimes I find it downright near impossible, but now I know how much better or honest I feel when I communicate in that way, I can’t really consider any other option, or modus operandi for behaving, not just professionally, but on a personal level too.

So let’s look at what holds us back from being our authentic, assertive selves

 

Why passive-aggressive behavior kills assertiveness

Just like aggressive communication, passive-aggressive communication is apposite to assertiveness. When someone is passive-aggressive they avoid being directly aggressive and instead engage in indirect, or passive aggression. Typically people who operate from a passive-aggressive place may deliberately procrastinate, avoid certain people or situations that they do not like, say they are ok, when actually they are seething with anger. [Dr Scott Wetzler calls it “Sugar-coated hostility.”] They may also shutdown and refuse to discuss the issue at hand, making progress of any kind impossible.

At work this kind of behaviour may exhibit itself as not doing a task they have been charged with, putting something off until the very last minute, or completing it late in order to punish the person who asked them to do it.

If it is so negative and potentially destructive, then why is this kind of behavior so common?

Early life experiences: As Berne says our upbringing has a powerful effect on how we see ourselves in relation to the world and others. For many people direct expressions of emotion were discouraged or not allowed. Therefore many people learn that it is too scary to express their real feelings openly so they find passive ways to process their anger and frustration instead.

Fear: Being assertive takes courage and is not always easy, so sometimes we all find it easier to deal with anger and frustration in covert ways, and this is fine. None of will manage to be assertive all of the time.

Settings and situations: Even if you did grow up in a household where you could freely express emotion, you might have found that at school, and later at work, that this was frowned upon so you adapted your behavior accordingly depending on the situation and the setting. 

While I would love to see assertiveness adopted as the norm for how human beings treat each other, realistically it is unlikely to happen. However, there is much we can do to change our own behaviour to positively influence those around us, particularly at work.

 

So how do we develop a culture of assertiveness in ourselves and at work?

The fastest and most effective way of developing and maintaining an I’m OK: You’re OK life position is through giving, receiving, and asking for positive recognition. People who feel positive about themselves appreciate and value others; they are able to give and receive positive recognition. Positive recognition inspires and motivates people
— Assertiveness and Diversity by Anni Townend: Palgrave Macmillan 2007

It is easy to assume that if people think well of us and treat us accordingly then we will naturally feel good about ourselves. However, the truth is that, like any shift in consciousness, the change has to come from us. This is where self-esteem comes in. The reason Dr Branden’s book was so revelatory for me, is that it was the first time I had made the connection with treating myself well and having good self-esteem. For all this time I had been waiting to find people who treated me with respect when in actual fact I didn’t value myself, or feel comfortable with positive feedback and recognition.

It might sound simple, but I really hadn’t made that connection before, so I was always in a passive or victim position, rather than in an assertive, creative position.

 

3 steps to adopting an “I’m OK, You’re OK” life position

1. Develop emotional intelligence through self-awareness:

Always, always acknowledge people’s feelings, and don’t belittle or talk down to them. If they sound angry, then acknowledge their anger or frustration for what it is. Equally acknowledge your own feelings and emotions, and be aware of how they impact on others.

2. Accept praise and positive feedback

Here’s an exercise to try out the next time someone gives you some positive feedback or praises you for something; instead of dismissing it or diminishing it, just thank them and tell them you appreciate their feedback. If you already find this easy and like receiving praise then you are probably already using assertive communication in your life. But if you find it difficult to hear or are quick to say something like, “it was no big deal”, or “oh you don’t need to say that”, then just check in with yourself and see how it feels when you do something different. Simply say “thank you” and smile!

3. Listen to some negative feedback without taking it personally:

Equally, try and hear some difficult feedback and see how that feels. This of course might be much harder but as assertiveness is also wrapped up with emotional intelligence and taking responsibility for your actions, you also need to learn to hear negative feedback from a position of assertiveness.

Remember, people rarely criticize us for who we inherently are. They criticize us for how we acted and how our behavior affected them. Once you can listen to some feedback about how your behavior affected someone else, without taking it personally, then you are on the road to using assertive communication.

If you would like to find out how business coaching and mentoring can help you be more assertive, then book a 30-minute phone call here. Let’s talk!

[For further reading on the subject of assertiveness go to Anni Townend, Scott Wetzler, Eric Berne]